THE COLLEGE HILL INDEPENDENT

Vol. 35 Issue 9

Nov 17, 2017

From the Editors

Give up Bitcoin. Install Bail Bloc!

Starting this past Wednesday, the online magazine the New Inquiry and the Bronx Freedom Fund are using Bail Bloc to raise funds to pay bail for low-income people in New York who have been detained.

How it works, from the creators: “When you download the app, a small part of your computer's unused processing power is redirected toward mining a popular cryptocurrency called Monero, which is secure, private, and untraceable. At the end of every month, we exchange the Monero for US dollars and donate the earnings to the Bronx Freedom Fund and through them, [towards] a new nation-wide initiative, The Bail Project.”

Bail is money that a recently-arrested person can pay to walk free until a trial takes place. This period can last for many weeks or months, sometimes years. But for lowincome people who get arrested, bail is just another method of criminalizing poverty and refusing them the right to a free trial. Their freedom is often only guaranteed by coercive plea deals. Bail Bloc is one step you can take to combat mass incarceration.

You can install the program here.

– KE

Arts

A House Musuem

Mystery in the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum

Arts, Nov 17 2017

by Isabelle Rea

Underneath the premiere painting of the Isabella Stewart Gardner collection, Titian’s Europa, hangs the skirt of Isabella Gardner’s own ball gown. …

Book Reviews

Arts, Nov 17 2017

by Liby Hays

New Releases / Reissues Cunny Poem by Bunny Rogers Cunny Poem is a collection of Bunny Rogers’s poetry written between 2012 …


Ephemera


Features

Vinegar, not Jam

A magical, maximalist artist

Features, Nov 17 2017

by Marielle Burt

“The Two of Swords! This card is something to fear. It means stability, equilibrium. Of course! I’m fucking terrified of stability,” …


Literary

The Trials of Odysseus and Me but Mostly Me

Literary, Nov 17 2017

by Aya Cheaito & Fadwa Ahmed

Perhaps it was the milk of the moon I drank tonight. Rivers poured vehemently. Poseidon. The sea was not as cold …


Metro

A Winding Path

Metro, Nov 17 2017

by Harry August

Providence is a divided city. Physical barriers—both natural, such as the Providence River, and manmade, like the I-95 highway system—work to …

No Delusions

A conversation with Dr. Maung Zarni on the Rohingya genocide

Metro, Nov 17 2017

by Chris Packs & Isabel DeBre

content warning: state violence, sexual violence, genocide, Islamophobia, graphic bodily mutilation This fall, the persecution of Rohingya people overwhelmed global media …

Losing Ocean in the Ocean State

A fishing industry in crisis

Metro, Nov 17 2017

by Kion You

After the rush of summer tourism at Point Judith, a small village home to Rhode Island’s largest fishing fleet, only those …


News

Week in Party Animals

News, Nov 17 2017

by Julia Rock, Julia Petrini & Kelton Ellis

THE POLISH WAY Last week, the Polish Health Ministry released a public service announcement encouraging it citizens to “breed like rabbits.” …


Science & Technology

Without Pedestals Everything Falls in the Mud

Queer ecology as an attack on hierarchy

Science & Technology, Nov 17 2017

by Lee Pivnik

Male cuttlefish have evolved a unique reproductive behavior. During mating season, they win the eye of a female by fighting off …

The World Under Glass

Mars, money, and matter in Arizona

Science & Technology, Nov 17 2017

by Olivia Kan-Sperling

Once upon a time in the 1980s, a Texas oil magnate, an architect, a systems theorist, and a hippie-businessman-scientist re-made the …


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